Tag Archives: CBSE English Poems

About Grief by Tagore

Say not in grief that she is no more
but say in thankfulness that she was.
A death is not the extinguishing of a light,
but the putting out of the
lamp because the dawn has come.

~ Rabindranath Tagore

Joy and Sorrow | Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet

Joy and Sorrow

Then a woman said, “Speak to us of Joy and Sorrow”.
And he answered:
Your joy is your sorrow unmasked.
And the selfsame well from which your laughter rises was oftentimes filled with your tears.
And how else can it be?
The deeper that sorrow carves into your being, the more joy you can contain.
Is not the cup that holds your wine the very cup that was burned in the potter’s over?
And is not the lute that soothes your spirit, the very wood that was hollowed out with knives?
When you are joyous, look deep into your heart and you shall find it is only that which has given you sorrow that is giving you joy.
When you are sorrowful look again in your heart, and you shall see that in truth you are weeping for that which has been your delight.
Some you say, “Joy is greater than sorrow”, and others say, “Nay, sorrow is the greater.”
But I say unto you, they are inseparable.
Together they come, and when sits alone with you at your board, remember that the other is asleep upon your bed.


Extract from Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet from CBSE 10th English Textbook.

For Anne Gregory by W B Yeats

This poem is a conversation between a young man and a young woman. What are they arguing about?

“Never shall a young man,
Thrown into despair
By those great honey-coloured
Ramparts at your ear,
Love you for yourself alone
And not your yellow hair.”

“But I can get a hair-dye
And set such colour there,
Brown, or black, or carrot,
That young men in despair
May love me for myself alone
And not my yellow hair.”

“I heard an old religious man
But yesternight declare
That he had found a text to prove
That only God, my dear,
Could love you for yourself alone
And not your yellow hair.”

~ WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS

William Butler Yeats (1865-1939) was an Irish nationalist. He was educated in London and Dublin. He was interested in folklore and mythology. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1923.


This is an excerpt from CBSE 10th English Textbook.